God Values Life!

photo credit: Marxchivist via photopin cc
photo credit: Marxchivist via photopin cc

The story of Noah’s ark has long been a classic Sunday school topic for children’s curriculum. There’s something really cute about the idea of Noah building a big boat and gathering a diverse array of animals on board. What isn’t cute, however, is the idea of a devastating flood killing all human and animal life apart from those on the ark. In fact, many opponents of Christianity (and Judaism) point toward the story of Noah’s ark as an example of what they see as a cruel religion.

Several things stand out to me when I read Genesis 6-9 but I would like to highlight two things in particular. The first point of notice involves the state of the earth before the deluge.

Then the Lord saw that the wickedness of man was great on the earth, and that every intent of the thoughts of his heart was only evil continually. The Lord was sorry that He had made man on the earth, and He was grieved in His heart. The Lord said, “I will blot out man whom I have created from the face of the land, from man to animals to creeping things and to birds of the sky; for I am sorry that I have made them.” But Noah found favor in the eyes of the Lord. . . Now the earth was corrupt in the sight of God, and the earth was filled with violence. God looked on the earth, and behold, it was corrupt; for all flesh had corrupted their way upon the earth. Genesis 6:5-8, 11-12 (NASB)

photo credit: expertinfantry via photopin cc
photo credit: expertinfantry via photopin cc

This passage explains, in human terms, how God felt about the human race at that point in time. The intent of every heart was evil and the entire world was filled with violence. When God violently flooded the Earth, He was simply giving the human race the fulfillment of its own actions—violence and destruction.

This destruction is the total opposite of God’s original design in the garden of Eden. Adam & Eve had been naked and unashamed, secure in God’s peace, and without fear of exploitation. When they chose the path of independence from God, however, everything changed—so much so that their firstborn son murdered his brother in a fit of envious rage. The level of violence only grew until God sent 40 days and 40 nights of nonstop rain.

I find it ironic that we want God to relate to us on our terms but we are repulsed when He actually does so. What we fail to see in Noah’s story is the second point I would like to highlight from Genesis 6-9: God values human life far more than most of us realize.

“Surely I will require your lifeblood; from every beast I will require it. And from every man, from every man’s brother I will require the life of man. Whoever sheds man’s blood, by man his blood shall be shed, for in the image of God He made man.” Genesis 9:5-6 (NASB)

photo credit: chantel beam photography via photopin cc
photo credit: chantel beam photography via photopin cc

Human life is sacred in the eyes of God and the unjust shedding of blood deserves an appropriate form of judgment. Thus, It is entirely just for God to judge unrighteous acts of violence committed against those who have been created in His own image.

There is yet another important point to this story that we can easily miss: Getting a fresh start is not the formula for a better world. It’s like my high school friend, Chris, who always seemed to get himself in trouble. At least once a week, he was turning over a new leaf. Unfortunately, that leaf never stayed turned in the right direction!

What the human race really needs are the willingness and the ability to relate to God on His terms. Only then, will we be able to experience true peace. Before we go there, however, we need to look at one particular aspect of the Old Covenant that will help us to better understand the severe judgment seen in the Old Testament. Be sure to stay tuned!

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